Tag Archives: Pork

Devil’s Pork Curry

Devil's Pork Curry

Devil’s Pork Curry

As a kid, my son Daniel loved this curry. At around 8 years old, you couldn’t make it hot enough for him, then he seemed to go off chilli heat and I forgot about it for years and years.

I originally found this recipe in a Woman’s Weekly curry cookbook but I wouldn’t know what cuisine it’s supposed to come from. No matter-it’s good! It looks like a lot of ingredients, but trust me, it’s easy to make. I made it using some of the lovely pork chops from the hand reared pig that Daniel bought us.

Devil’s Pork Curry

  • 750 g diced pork
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 medium red onions, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 12 curry leaves (dried or fresh, optional if unavailable)
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • 4 small red chilies, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh lemongrass (or zest of 1 lemon)
  • 1 teaspoon tamarind paste (or 1 tablespoon lemon juice)
  • 2 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 1/2 cup macadamia nuts, finely chopped

    Devil's Pork Curry

    Devil’s Pork Curry

Method

  1. Combine pork, vinegar and soy sauce in a bowl, mix well and all to stand for 20 minutes.
  2. Drain, reserving liquid.
  3. Heat the oil in a large pan, stir in onions, garlic, ginger, curry leaves, sugar, cinnamon, fenugreek seeds, chillies, turmeric and lemon grass.
  4. Stir over medium heat for 5 minutes or until onions are soft.
  5. Add pork to onion mixture , stir over high heat until pork is browned.
  6. Transfer mix to medium saucepan, stir in combined tamarind concentrate, fish sauce, stock, reserved liquid and nuts.
  7. Stir over high heat until mixture boils, reduce heat and simmer, covered for 15 minutes.
  8. Remove lid and simmer for a further 30 minutes or until almost all the liquid has evaporated.
  9. Serve.

* Editing to add: This was delicious-hot, but not so hot as the flavours didn’t still come through. The pork cooked up a treat-tender and moist.

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Makin’ Bacon

Bacon

Bacon

My youngest son Daniel and I share a love of cooking, buying from farm gates, game meats, and making whatever we can, from what we buy, from scratch. I guess of all the people in our family, we are the ones who really like to know where our food comes from!

Our pig

Our pig

Right now with our house let out in Warrnambool, we are based here in Traralgon with Daniel for an unknown length of time.

Before we arrived with our freezer full of fish fillets, crab, squid and rabbits, Daniel filled his with organic grass fed beef from the Glengarry Free Range Egg lady he deals with at work, and a 5 month old pig  that he arranged to have butchered for us. Both lots of meat are proving to be amazing which is always good when you have a lot of it to eat.

Daniel has just started getting interested in the home curing of meats so the first thing he and I did when Russ and I arrived was to cure some of the pork belly to make bacon.  He (Daniel) organised the cure for it, I turned it daily for 5 days, then yesterday, I washed it and oven baked it at 120 c for about 2.5 hours until it had reached 64c internally.

Home made bacon

Home made bacon

This morning, Russell cut off a few slices (well small slabs maybe) and we cooked it for our brunch. It’s amazing to say the least.

Daniel’s Bacon

  • 1.2 kg pork belly
  • 30 g salt
  • 15 g sugar
  • 5 g pepper
  • about a teaspoon of liquid smoke
  • good sprinkling dried oregano and dried thyme
  • 1 g curing salt #2

Method

  1. Rub the pork belly with the combined remaining ingredients. Place in a non-reactive container or zip lock bag and refrigerate. Turn every day for 5 days. Can leave it for longer but it’ll get saltier by the day.
  2. On day 5, wash and pat dry, then bake in an oven preheated to 120 c for about two hours or until the internal temp reaches 64 c when tested with a thermometre.
  3. Cool then refrigerate. Use as you would any commercial bacon.

My attempt at Corned Silverside (under instruction)

  • 2 kg fresh silverside, trimmed of most of its fat
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 180 g salt
  • 4 g curing salt #2
  • Pickling spice mix (ingredients below)
  • 1 litre very hot water
  • 2 litres very cold water

Pickling Spice Mix

  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon allspice berries
  • 1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1 teaspoon dill seeds
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 4 dried crushed chillies

Method

  1. Place the meat in a non reactive food grade container (garbage bags and bins are not food grade) or zip lock bag.
  2. Mix the salt, sugar, curing salt and pickling spices together with the hot water, stirring until the salt and sugar are dissolved.
  3. Add the cold water, stir then pour over the meat in the container.
  4. Submerge the meat in the brine in the brine with a weight (I used a plate)  placed on it to keep it under. It needs to stay under for about at least a week.
  5. I’ve read that it can stay longer so it might work well to cook one, then remove the next one a week or so later and cook it?

 

 

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Good News

We got the call at 4pm to tell us the rails had arrived, were fitted and we could pick our ute up. We did, the boat is now on the roof, and we’re on our way in the morning.

Caramelised Pork Belly
A couple of days ago, I suggested to Russ he should take me out for dinner on our last night here because we’ve been stuck here for a week. He suggested I could find something in the freezer and he’d cook me dinner instead (haha, fell for it again!). I found a pork belly, so he cooked me/us Caramelised Pork Belly over rice with an Asian Style Coleslaw on the side. I doubt we could have got better anywhere in town!Asian Style Coleslaw

Caramelised Pork Belly

  • 600g pork belly
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 star anise
  • 1cm piece fresh ginger
  • 4 tablespoons palm sugar syrup
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce

Method

  1. Put the pork belly in a saucepan it just fits in. Best if the skin doesn’t get too wet.
  2. Add the stock, water, soy, star anise and ginger. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer VERY gently for 1/2 to 2 hours or until really tender. Remove and cool.
  3. Heat a grill to hot and place the pork belly under it watching it carefully until the skin has crisped up. It will pop and puff up.
  4. Let it cool until you can handle it, then cut into 1cm (ish) chunks.
  5. Place the syrup in a frying pan and cook a few minutes until it reduces a little, then add the pork chunks. Cook a few minutes until hot then add in the fish sauce, give it a toss and serve.