Tag Archives: Curry

Devil’s Pork Curry

Devil's Pork Curry

Devil’s Pork Curry

As a kid, my son Daniel loved this curry. At around 8 years old, you couldn’t make it hot enough for him, then he seemed to go off chilli heat and I forgot about it for years and years.

I originally found this recipe in a Woman’s Weekly curry cookbook but I wouldn’t know what cuisine it’s supposed to come from. No matter-it’s good! It looks like a lot of ingredients, but trust me, it’s easy to make. I made it using some of the lovely pork chops from the hand reared pig that Daniel bought us.

Devil’s Pork Curry

  • 750 g diced pork
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 medium red onions, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 12 curry leaves (dried or fresh, optional if unavailable)
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • 4 small red chilies, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh lemongrass (or zest of 1 lemon)
  • 1 teaspoon tamarind paste (or 1 tablespoon lemon juice)
  • 2 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 1/2 cup macadamia nuts, finely chopped

    Devil's Pork Curry

    Devil’s Pork Curry

Method

  1. Combine pork, vinegar and soy sauce in a bowl, mix well and all to stand for 20 minutes.
  2. Drain, reserving liquid.
  3. Heat the oil in a large pan, stir in onions, garlic, ginger, curry leaves, sugar, cinnamon, fenugreek seeds, chillies, turmeric and lemon grass.
  4. Stir over medium heat for 5 minutes or until onions are soft.
  5. Add pork to onion mixture , stir over high heat until pork is browned.
  6. Transfer mix to medium saucepan, stir in combined tamarind concentrate, fish sauce, stock, reserved liquid and nuts.
  7. Stir over high heat until mixture boils, reduce heat and simmer, covered for 15 minutes.
  8. Remove lid and simmer for a further 30 minutes or until almost all the liquid has evaporated.
  9. Serve.

* Editing to add: This was delicious-hot, but not so hot as the flavours didn’t still come through. The pork cooked up a treat-tender and moist.

Quick Fish Curry

Quick Fish Curry

Quick Fish Curry

After an afternoon spent fishing off Eagle Bluff, I wanted something super quick for dinner. I decided to curry the snapper we caught. The fishing was slow, but the weather was gorgeous so it wasn’t a totally wasted drive out there.

Quick Fish Curry

  • 1 tablespoon veg oil
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 1 red chilli, chopped
  • Curry paste (I used 3 tablespoons Sharwoods Korma)
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 tomato, cut into 8 wedges
  • 1 red capsicum, cut into 2 cm squares
  • White fish fillets, (enough for 2 people) cut into big chunks
  • Chopped spring onion to garnish
  • Steamed Rice to serve

    Quick Fish Curry

    Quick Fish Curry

Method

  1. Heat the oil and add the onion, garlic, ginger and chilli, cook over a medium heat stirring, until the onion is softened.
  2. Stir through the curry paste, cook a couple of minutes, then add the coconut milk. Simmer gently for about 5 minutes, adding a few tablespoons of water if the sauce cooks down too much.
  3. Add the tomato and capsicum and cook 2 minutes, then gently push the fish into the sauce, cover and cook until the fish is done (mine took about 3 minutes). Serve over rice with spring onions scattered over the top.

Afternoon of the giants

Just one of eleven

Just one of eleven

Sunday, we went out after lunch to Fowlers Camp to fish. It was windy and choppy for the 4 or so kilometres across the bay, but once we got beyond Eagle Bluff and into more open water it flattened right out. We caught around 40 pink snapper, with about 10 of those over 40cm but under that magic figure of 50cm. Russ eventually caught us one fish to take home. We ate him last night as crumbed fish with creamy curry sauce-one of our favourite sauces for fish and chips. When Russ cleaned him, he had two plastic lures in his gut, with no sign of them breaking down. Another smaller snapper we brought in threw up his bait then a plastic on the deck. I wonder just how good they actually are for fish if they can’t digest them?!
Crumbed fish with creamy curry sauce

Crumbed fish with creamy curry sauce

Yesterday (Monday) as the weather was basically crap we stayed in doors and the only energetic thing I did was to make fish stock.

Today after lunch, Russ reckoned we should go out to Monkey Mia and crab. We put our nets in at 2pm and pulled them out at 4pm and came home with 11 really good sized crabs. So good in fact, we let two size crabs go because they looked so tiny against our others.

When we first put the boat in, I thought we were crazy, it was windy and choppy and I knew who’d end up the coldest and wettest!. Anyhow, it settled down quite quickly and we had a pleasant couple of hours. As we drove the 27ks home, I was running all sorts of ideas through my head for our lovely catch. In the end, I decided on spaghetti with a tomato, chilli, crab sauce for dinner tonight, 2 big fat crab sandwiches for lunch tomorrow, and a couple of packets of picked meat for the freezer. We vacuum seal them and they become crab cakes, dip, pizza, bruschetta etc down the track. Much better than the little tubs or cans of crab you buy in a supermarket!

Spaghetti with Tomato, Chilli and Crab Sauce

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, sliced
  • 2 chillis (heat is up to you, I used Thai Birdseye)
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 1 440g can whole tomatoes, chopped (I hate pre chopped canned tomatoes)
  • salt and pepper to taste (I’m heavy handed with both)
  • zest of a lemon
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • pasta water-enough to loosen the sauce up
  • cooked spaghetti or pasta (I like really thin spag with sauces like this)
  • cooked crab meat (I had 2 big ones for the two of us)
  • Spaghetti with tomato, chilli and crab sauce

    Spaghetti with tomato, chilli and crab sauce

Method

  1. Heat the oil over a medium heat. Add the onion and cook a few minutes or until softened. Add the chilli and garlic and cook for a couple of minutes more.
  2. Add the white wine and cook until it’s reduced, then tip in the can of tomatoes and chop (I do this with kitchen scissors) Season well with salt and pepper.
  3. Allow to cook down until the tomatoes are well softened and the mix has reduced. Add in a half cup or so of pasta water to loosen the sauce back up and give it a starchy “creaminess”.
  4. Stir through the zest,lemon juice and parsley, then toss through the cooked pasta.
  5. Finally add the cooked crab, toss lightly again and serve.
  6. Along with a final slug of olive oil, I held back a bit of parsley, zest and claw meat to garnish the dish.

Lamb Dopiaza and Smoked Fish and Rice Pie

Smoked Fish and Rice Pie

Smoked Fish and Rice Pie

I might have mentioned before, we have family on a farm at New Norcia 140ks out of Perth. They keep us supplied in wild rabbits and kill their own meat so we do a swap with them occasionally for fish. This curry was made with their lamb. We prepared a half recipe, but altered some of the spices up to suit us. I’ll write it as I would make it for 4 because I reckon the original recipe was a bit light on for spices for a curry!

Lamb Dopiaza

  • 2 onions, sliced into rings
  • 2 onions, roughly chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 2.5cm piece of ginger, grated
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons chilli powder (or to taste!)
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (original asks for 1 but I don’t much like it!)
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • 4 tablespoons water
  • 4 tablespoons oil
  • 600g boneless lamb, cut into bite sized cubes
  • 6 tablespoons natural yoghurt
  • salt and pepper (I used a teaspoon of salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper for our half recipe)
  • fresh coriander to garnish
  • steamed rice to serve
Lamb Dopiaza

Lamb Dopiaza

Method

  1. Put the roughly chopped onions in a food processor with the garlic, ginger, ground coriander, cumin, turmeric, chilli powder, cinnamon and garam masala. Add the water and process to a paste.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a pan and cook the remaining (sliced) onions and cook stirring for about 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside.
  3. Add the rest of the oil, heat, then add the lamb and cook, stirring for 5 minutes. Remove to a plate with a slotted spoon.
  4. Add the onion paste to the pan and cook over a medium heat, stirring until the oil separates. Stir in the yoghurt, salt and pepper and the lamb. Stir well.
  5. Bring the mixture gently to the boil then reduce to a simmer and cook around an hour or until the meat is very tender. Stir in the reserved onion rings and cook a further 5 mins.
  6. Serve over steamed rice garnished with coriander.

We had rice leftover from our yummy Lamb Dopiaza (lamb curry with onions) last night, and smoked salmon needing to be used, so I adapted this from an old fashioned Tuna and Rice pie recipe. I’d make this again with our own smoked fish (if we had any left lol) as it made for a great lunch for us today.

Smoked Fish and Rice Pie
Base

  • 2 cups cooked rice
  • 1/4 small onion, finely diced
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
  • salt and pepper
Smoked Fish and Rice Pie

Smoked Fish and Rice Pie

Filling

  • 200g smoked fish (or about a cup if using my own)
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • 1/4 small onion finely diced
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup grated cheese (I used parmesan as it also needs using up, but tasty would be better)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 large tomato, slice thinly

Method

  1. Preheat your oven to 190c
  2. Grease a pie dish (mine’s a 6 cup one)
  3. Mix all the base ingredients together well, then spread over the case and sides of your pie dish.
  4. Place the salmon and capers on top of the rice base.
  5. Mix together the eggs, onion, milk, cheese, oregano and salt and pepper. Pour over the salmon and rice etc.
  6. Top with the tomato slices and bake in the oven for 45 minutes or until set and golden.

Shark!

Goan-style Fish Curry

Goan-style Fish Curry

But just a little one!

Fishing was slow yesterday and crabs non-existent so when the wind got up (as it seems to every day) we decided to call it quits, pull the nets in and go home. Much excitement when the last net I pulled in had a shark tangled in it. She (no claspers) was close to dead, so we decided to bring her home and eat her. I love shark (or flake as Victorians call it) but it’s hit and miss just how good they’ll be. We’ve found further north that they can get a bit “stringy” and are not at all good eating. Russ can tell the minute he starts to fillet them whether we’ll be keeping them. Lucky this one was OK because I’d already decided we should curry it!

I am a bit funny about “wet” fish dishes, preferring my fish Panko crumbed most often. I hate the thought of fish flaking to bits in a dish as it doesn’t seem at all appetising, and I would NEVER order a “fish” curry out in case they gave me some type of fish I’d normally choose not to eat (Nile Perch or Basa come to mind). And what if it wasn’t fresh?!

So a beautiful piece of just caught shark, with it’s very slight iodine flavour, firm but tender flesh, really makes me happy. And the curry Russ made from our new curry cookbook made me even happier!

I should add in the end, we came home with a mixed bag of fish-a whiting, flathead, a trevally, two herrings and the shark so it was a pleasant couple of hours. The trevally and herring are already smoked, and the remaining shark, flathead and whiting frozen. And while we were fishing, we saw the big white (albino?) sting ray that inhabits the spot where we fish. We hadn’t seen him up until then, and not for a couple of years, so it was good to see him still alive and looking well!

The day before yesterday, I felt a big lazy bite on my line and started to pull in a big lazy something. It was the biggest banjo shark we’ve ever caught here. They are quite good eating, but I just couldn’t do it to him-even a big one doesn’t have that much flesh to make it fair (in my opinion) so back he went!

Earlier this week (last Sunday), we drove to Perth so we could baby sit new grandson Harry. It was his parents first wedding anniversary and they celebrated by going to the movies in the afternoon and then out to dinner in the evening. We had a wonderful time with Harry who was such a good little 6 week old boy for us. He is gorgeous.

Monday and Tuesday night were spent with our daughter-in-law Leah, as son Blair was away in Africa for work. We had a great time with Russ cooking us dinner on the Monday, then dinner out at Tamarind Cambodian restaurant Tuesday.

The trip to Perth also allowed us to do our little bit of Christmas shopping, discuss Christmas/New year plans with Leah, arrange to get Russ’s glasses repaired, buy some new clothes and collect our mail. On the way home, we stopped in Donnybrook for more lovely avocados, tomatoes, cherries and zucchinis. The cherries are in season right now and gorgeous. I thought I might make a relish for Christmas dinner with them, but too late! They are gone!

Back here in Walpole, we decided to extend our stay another 4 days, so we are now here until the 20th, then will overnight at Pinjarra before taking the van up to New Norcia where it’ll holiday for about a month.

Here’s the recipe for the curry as Russ made it. It was very saucy (as we like it) and could easily have taken more fish, or the prawns the original recipe added in.

Goan-style Fish Curry

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
  • 12 fresh curry leaves(we used 2 bay leaves, but would normally have curry leaves)
  • 6 shallots finely chopped (we used a small red onion)
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander
  • 1 teaspoon chilli powder (or to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 440 ml can coconut milk
  • 400g firm fleshed white fish fillet, cut into large chunks
  • finely grated rind, and juice of a lime
  • fresh coriander to garnish
Goan-style Fish Curry

Goan-style Fish Curry

Method

  1. Heat a wok over high heat, then add the oil. Add the mustard seeds and stir for about a minute or until they pop.Stir in the curry leaves.
  2. Add the shallots and garlic and stir for about 5 minutes, or until the shallots are golden.
  3. Stir in the spices and salt and stir for a further 30 seconds.
  4. Add the coconut milk, bring to the boil then reduce the heat and stir for about 2 minutes.
  5. Reduce the heat to low, add the fish and simmer for about 5 minutes, or until the fish is cooked.
  6. Add half the lime juice, taste and decide if you want more!
  7. Sprinkle with the lime rind and serve. Sprinkle with fresh coriander leaves.

Fish equals recipes

Russ coming around to pick me up off the beach to go fishing

Russ coming around to pick me up off the beach to go fishing

We caught ourselves 10 fish yesterday, so it was fish for dinner, to freeze and to pickle. Before dinner, I made the Crab and Croc Tour Karumba’s version of pickled fish as it was the first I’d ever tasted, and I loved it, and they kindly e-mailed the recipe to me recently. This, (including the caps)is posted as I copied it from the e-mail with my own instructions in brackets).

Croc and Crab Tours (Karumba) Fish Dish

CUT FISH THIN – 2 TO 3MM INTO SMALL PIECES
FISH RECOMMENDED IS QUEENFISH/TREVALLY
CUT ONION IN HALF AND CUT THICK (I prefer thinly sliced)
COVER WITH BROWN VINEGAR
SALT GOOD SPRINKLE (I reckon I used close on a tablespoon tasting as I added a little more)
PEPPER GOOD SPRINKLE EXTRA (estimating about 1/2 a teaspoon)
TABLESPOON SUGAR
DASH OF OLIVE OIL & DICED CHILLI TOO TASTE

Crab and Croc Tours Fish Dish (pickled fish)

Crab and Croc Tours Fish Dish (pickled fish)

STIR AND LET SIT FOR 5 MINUTES
STIR AND LET SIT FOR 5 MINUTES MORE
PUT INTO FRIDGE
SERVE AFTER 6 TO 24 HOURS.

Dinner was Red Throat Emperor fillets caught in the morning, served with a creamy curry sauce and Gobi Aloo(curried potato and cauli). The original  fish recipe is by Mandy on Food.com, she got it from an old Kraft website. I’ve made it quite often.

Crumbed Fish with a Creamy Curry Sauce

  • 750 g skinless fish fillets
  • lemon juice
  • 3 teaspoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon Madras curry powder
  • 2 teaspoons flour
  • 1/2 cup milk (may need a little more)
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • salt & pepper
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice, extra
  • flour, seasoned with salt & pepper
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • breadcrumbs
Crumbed fish with creamy curry sauce

Crumbed fish with creamy curry sauce

Method

  1. Sprinkle fish with lemon juice
  2. Melt butter in a pan, add curry powder & flour & stir for a few minutes.
  3. Slowly stir in the milk and cook stirring for 1/2 minute.
  4. Stir in mayonnaise, salt, pepper, sour cream and extra lemon juice, simmer for one minutes & add parsley, set aside until needed.
  5. Cut fish into bite sized pieces & coat with seasoned flour, dip into egg which has been combined with water and coat with breadcrumbs.
  6. Fry fish in hot oil until golden & tender, drain & serve with sauce which has been gently reheated.

Today (Thursday 25th) we were about to go fishing when there was a knock at our door. It was Gail and Geoff of the blog Maccas Tracks Around Oz http://gmcbride1.wordpress.com/ I’ve been following their blog for some weeks now and realised we were here in the same park very close to each other when I read they were opposite the bakery. We are also opposite the bakery! Turns out we are about 3 vans apart. And it turns out, we were in Broome in the same park at the same time, and Tom Price. We visited Hamersley Gorge on the same day too. Amazing.

Ready to go fishing

Ready to go fishing

Fishing today was a bit lean, we only brought home three red throat emperor and one cod. I caught quite a big emperor though so I was happy about that.