Tag Archives: Coriander

Cerviche

Cerviche

Cerviche

Always on the lookout for new fish recipes, I decided as we love pickled fish so much, it was time to make my own fish cerviche. I’ve eaten it made by my good friend Chris Whitmore years ago, and I’ve eaten yabby cerviche, but never made my own.

I looked at a few recipes, then took what I liked from them to make my own version-some used avocado and that would be nice, but at $6 each here, it was never going to happen, some used capsicum (bell pepper) but that texture seemed wrong. My daughter-in-law put me onto Ayam coconut milk powder (as opposed to the tinned stuff we usually buy). It’s cheaper and I can make up smaller batches, control the strength (milk or cream) and can add it direct to curries where I want a coconut flavour.

Reduced Coconut Milk

Reduced Coconut Milk

Marinating Charlie

Marinating Charlie

We caught a number of fish yesterday, but decided our favourite Charlie Court Cod would be good for this. It’s a lovely sweet flavoured, delicate fish, but small and not so easy to deal with. Russ does deal with it though as we’ve yet to find a fish we reckon has better flavour or texture. Most recipes said the fish should come from the fishmonger as fresh as possible. We caught these yesterday but over the years have decided that fish rested in the fridge for 24 hours seems to be the best. Some might argue, but that’s how we like it. Charlie fillets are only small so I just cut into squares (rather than cubes as you would with a fatter fillet) and marinated for 1.5 hours. It worked really well in that time.

Cerviche

  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 6 mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup lime juice
  • 200g white fish, diced into 1cm chunks
  • 1 red chilli, chopped
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced length-ways (julienned)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 small bunch coriander (pick the leaves off)
  • (optional and would add if cost was better) 1 small avocado, diced
Cerviche

Cerviche

Method

  1. Put the coconut milk in a small pan over a low heat, and reduce by half. Drop in the mint leaves, cool then remove the mint leaves and discard.
  2. Place the diced fish in a non reactive (glass or ceramic) dish and pour over the lime juice. Refrigerate for between 1/2 hour (rare) to 3 hours (well done).
  3. Pour off most of the lime juice and discard, then add the coconut milk and other ingredients-check the salt and sugar is in balance then serve garnished with coriander and/or mint sprigs.

Serves 2

Luscious Limes

Luscious Limes

Advertisements

Shark!

Goan-style Fish Curry

Goan-style Fish Curry

But just a little one!

Fishing was slow yesterday and crabs non-existent so when the wind got up (as it seems to every day) we decided to call it quits, pull the nets in and go home. Much excitement when the last net I pulled in had a shark tangled in it. She (no claspers) was close to dead, so we decided to bring her home and eat her. I love shark (or flake as Victorians call it) but it’s hit and miss just how good they’ll be. We’ve found further north that they can get a bit “stringy” and are not at all good eating. Russ can tell the minute he starts to fillet them whether we’ll be keeping them. Lucky this one was OK because I’d already decided we should curry it!

I am a bit funny about “wet” fish dishes, preferring my fish Panko crumbed most often. I hate the thought of fish flaking to bits in a dish as it doesn’t seem at all appetising, and I would NEVER order a “fish” curry out in case they gave me some type of fish I’d normally choose not to eat (Nile Perch or Basa come to mind). And what if it wasn’t fresh?!

So a beautiful piece of just caught shark, with it’s very slight iodine flavour, firm but tender flesh, really makes me happy. And the curry Russ made from our new curry cookbook made me even happier!

I should add in the end, we came home with a mixed bag of fish-a whiting, flathead, a trevally, two herrings and the shark so it was a pleasant couple of hours. The trevally and herring are already smoked, and the remaining shark, flathead and whiting frozen. And while we were fishing, we saw the big white (albino?) sting ray that inhabits the spot where we fish. We hadn’t seen him up until then, and not for a couple of years, so it was good to see him still alive and looking well!

The day before yesterday, I felt a big lazy bite on my line and started to pull in a big lazy something. It was the biggest banjo shark we’ve ever caught here. They are quite good eating, but I just couldn’t do it to him-even a big one doesn’t have that much flesh to make it fair (in my opinion) so back he went!

Earlier this week (last Sunday), we drove to Perth so we could baby sit new grandson Harry. It was his parents first wedding anniversary and they celebrated by going to the movies in the afternoon and then out to dinner in the evening. We had a wonderful time with Harry who was such a good little 6 week old boy for us. He is gorgeous.

Monday and Tuesday night were spent with our daughter-in-law Leah, as son Blair was away in Africa for work. We had a great time with Russ cooking us dinner on the Monday, then dinner out at Tamarind Cambodian restaurant Tuesday.

The trip to Perth also allowed us to do our little bit of Christmas shopping, discuss Christmas/New year plans with Leah, arrange to get Russ’s glasses repaired, buy some new clothes and collect our mail. On the way home, we stopped in Donnybrook for more lovely avocados, tomatoes, cherries and zucchinis. The cherries are in season right now and gorgeous. I thought I might make a relish for Christmas dinner with them, but too late! They are gone!

Back here in Walpole, we decided to extend our stay another 4 days, so we are now here until the 20th, then will overnight at Pinjarra before taking the van up to New Norcia where it’ll holiday for about a month.

Here’s the recipe for the curry as Russ made it. It was very saucy (as we like it) and could easily have taken more fish, or the prawns the original recipe added in.

Goan-style Fish Curry

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
  • 12 fresh curry leaves(we used 2 bay leaves, but would normally have curry leaves)
  • 6 shallots finely chopped (we used a small red onion)
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander
  • 1 teaspoon chilli powder (or to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 440 ml can coconut milk
  • 400g firm fleshed white fish fillet, cut into large chunks
  • finely grated rind, and juice of a lime
  • fresh coriander to garnish
Goan-style Fish Curry

Goan-style Fish Curry

Method

  1. Heat a wok over high heat, then add the oil. Add the mustard seeds and stir for about a minute or until they pop.Stir in the curry leaves.
  2. Add the shallots and garlic and stir for about 5 minutes, or until the shallots are golden.
  3. Stir in the spices andĀ salt and stir for a further 30 seconds.
  4. Add the coconut milk, bring to the boil then reduce the heat and stir for about 2 minutes.
  5. Reduce the heat to low, add the fish and simmer for about 5 minutes, or until the fish is cooked.
  6. Add half the lime juice, taste and decide if you want more!
  7. Sprinkle with the lime rind and serve. Sprinkle with fresh coriander leaves.

Fishing today was fun until we lost a rod, reel, and rod holder!

Leggy Peggy's Chermoula on Spangled Emperor

Leggy Peggy’s Chermoula on Spangled Emperor

Nothing like the loss of some gear to put a bit of a dampener on things. We were up near the north passage for the first time and fishing quite happily when we decided to have our lunch. Russ popped a fairly good rod and reel into the rod holder and started to unwrap his sandwiches. Something took the bait, steel trace and hook, rod and reel and finally ripped the rod holder from the side of the boat. It was over the edge and gone in a millisecond! Russ nearly tipped US into the drink making a lunge for it all but to no avail. It’s not the loss that’s as annoying as the replacing of it. We’ll have to buy one in Exmouth and it’ll be more than we want to pay there.

We didn’t go out for long but managed to come home with 8 fish including one huge spangled emperor, two trevally and 5 Charlie Court Cod.

The spangled emperorĀ  (or some of him) will be cooked tonight using my good friend Leggy Peggy’s Chermoula recipe. You can find it posted on food.com

Peggy Leggy’s Note:
Chermoula is a North African marinade, used especially for fish. It also makes a great dipping sauce or salad dressing. This recipe has plenty of tang and has been adapted from one by Julie Le Clerc. I use coriander (cilantro) rather than parsley and Lee Kum Kee’s Chili Garlic Sauce rather than a small red chili. I like the end product so much that I can eat it with a spoon. Yummo!

Chermoula

  • 1 bunch fresh coriander or 1 bunch flat leaf parsley
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and bruised
  • 1 teaspoon cumin, ground
  • 1 teaspoon coriander, ground
  • 1 teaspoon paprika, ground
  • 1 small red chili pepper, seeded (or 1 teaspoon of chili sauce)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 lemon, juice of
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
Leggy Peggy's Chermoula on Spangled Emperor

Leggy Peggy’s Chermoula on Spangled Emperor

Method

  1. Pound all ingredients together in a large mortar and pestle or buzz in a food processor. You want a rough-textured paste.

Note: I use all the coriander stems.

Chermoula will keep several days in the fridge.

We also had another food.com recipe posted by NurseJaney. Couscous with Garbanzo Beans (chickpeas) and Golden Raisins (Sultanas).

NurseJaney is from the US hence the different measurements and names of ingredients. I’m making this recipe for a swap game I participate in most months. In return, NurseJaney and two other team mates will make a recipe I have posted there.

Couscous with Garbanzo Beans (chickpeas) and Golden Raisins (Sultanas).

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons garlic oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup couscous
  • 1 (15 ounce) can garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 cup golden raisin
  • salt and pepper
Couscous with Garbanzos and Golden Raisins

Couscous with Garbanzos and Golden Raisins

Method

  1. Finely grate peel from lemon to equal 1 1/2 tsp., set aside. Squeeze 2 Tbsp. juice from lemon.
  2. Combine 2 cups water. lemon juice, garlic oil, and ground cinnamon in medium saucepan. Bring to boil, simmer 1 minute. Remove from heat. Stir in couscous.
  3. Cover and let stand about 5 minutes, until water almost absorbed.
  4. Mix in garbanzo beans, golden raisins, and reserved lemon peel. Cover and let stand 5 minutes longer.
  5. Fluff couscous with fork. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowl and serve.

And lastly we had an eggplant salad. The eggplant, tomatoes, capsicum and spring onion all came from those stalls at the farm gates last Wednesday. The salad can also be found on food.com and was posted by Middle Eastern by Mag.

Lebanese Eggplant Salad – (Salatit El Batinjan)

  • 1 medium eggplant
  • 1 cup diced fresh tomato
  • 1 cup diced bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped scallion (or any kind of onions)
  • 1 garlic clove, mince
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 lemon, juice of
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • salt, pepper to taste
Lebanese Eggplant Salad

Lebanese Eggplant Salad

Method

  1. Put the whole eggplant as is, (only cut and remove the stem from the top), on a baking sheet and bake it. You’ll notice when it’s done that the juice came out on the baking sheet and the skin is almost toasted and it becomes soft when you punch it with a knife.
  2. Let it cool for a bit then cut it in half and remove the skin; just cut it roughly into small/medium diced pieces and put it in the salad bowl, add any juices. Then add the rest of the ingredients and mix the salad and serve.

This is good with pita bread on the side