Category Archives: Finger Food and Nibbles

Eggplant Dip or Baba Ganoush Without the Tahini

Eggplant Dip

Eggplant Dip

Friday 3rd, we took a day off from our usual fishing to do a few things that needed doing including the repair of a number of nasty stone chips in our windscreen. I decided to make a dip as we had the friend of friends in Warrnambool coming around at 5pm for drinks.

We bought a couple of lovely eggplants in Carnarvon, and as I had no tahini, I decided to go ahead and make a tahiniless Baba Ganoush as a change from the usual ratatouille I’d make using them.

I set the trays high in our little pizza oven and turned it up to about 220c. When the eggplant skin was blackened and the fruit had collapsed I let it cool, then peeled the skin off and discarded it. The seeds were fairly immature so I left them in.

The dip was great-a little bite to it from the garlic and many less kilojoules without the tahini.

Baba Ganoush

  • 1 medium eggplant, cooked as above, skin removed
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • sea salt flakes and ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • olive oil and paprika to finish
Eggplant Dip

Eggplant Dip

Method

  1. Process the eggplant, garlic, lemon juice and salt and pepper until smooth. Add the olive oil in a slow stream and process until creamy.
  2. Spoon into a serving dish and drizzle with a little extra oil, then sprinkle with paprika to finish.
  3. Serve with crusty bread, crackers or vegie sticks.
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Fish equals recipes

Russ coming around to pick me up off the beach to go fishing

Russ coming around to pick me up off the beach to go fishing

We caught ourselves 10 fish yesterday, so it was fish for dinner, to freeze and to pickle. Before dinner, I made the Crab and Croc Tour Karumba’s version of pickled fish as it was the first I’d ever tasted, and I loved it, and they kindly e-mailed the recipe to me recently. This, (including the caps)is posted as I copied it from the e-mail with my own instructions in brackets).

Croc and Crab Tours (Karumba) Fish Dish

CUT FISH THIN – 2 TO 3MM INTO SMALL PIECES
FISH RECOMMENDED IS QUEENFISH/TREVALLY
CUT ONION IN HALF AND CUT THICK (I prefer thinly sliced)
COVER WITH BROWN VINEGAR
SALT GOOD SPRINKLE (I reckon I used close on a tablespoon tasting as I added a little more)
PEPPER GOOD SPRINKLE EXTRA (estimating about 1/2 a teaspoon)
TABLESPOON SUGAR
DASH OF OLIVE OIL & DICED CHILLI TOO TASTE

Crab and Croc Tours Fish Dish (pickled fish)

Crab and Croc Tours Fish Dish (pickled fish)

STIR AND LET SIT FOR 5 MINUTES
STIR AND LET SIT FOR 5 MINUTES MORE
PUT INTO FRIDGE
SERVE AFTER 6 TO 24 HOURS.

Dinner was Red Throat Emperor fillets caught in the morning, served with a creamy curry sauce and Gobi Aloo(curried potato and cauli). The original  fish recipe is by Mandy on Food.com, she got it from an old Kraft website. I’ve made it quite often.

Crumbed Fish with a Creamy Curry Sauce

  • 750 g skinless fish fillets
  • lemon juice
  • 3 teaspoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon Madras curry powder
  • 2 teaspoons flour
  • 1/2 cup milk (may need a little more)
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • salt & pepper
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice, extra
  • flour, seasoned with salt & pepper
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • breadcrumbs
Crumbed fish with creamy curry sauce

Crumbed fish with creamy curry sauce

Method

  1. Sprinkle fish with lemon juice
  2. Melt butter in a pan, add curry powder & flour & stir for a few minutes.
  3. Slowly stir in the milk and cook stirring for 1/2 minute.
  4. Stir in mayonnaise, salt, pepper, sour cream and extra lemon juice, simmer for one minutes & add parsley, set aside until needed.
  5. Cut fish into bite sized pieces & coat with seasoned flour, dip into egg which has been combined with water and coat with breadcrumbs.
  6. Fry fish in hot oil until golden & tender, drain & serve with sauce which has been gently reheated.

Today (Thursday 25th) we were about to go fishing when there was a knock at our door. It was Gail and Geoff of the blog Maccas Tracks Around Oz http://gmcbride1.wordpress.com/ I’ve been following their blog for some weeks now and realised we were here in the same park very close to each other when I read they were opposite the bakery. We are also opposite the bakery! Turns out we are about 3 vans apart. And it turns out, we were in Broome in the same park at the same time, and Tom Price. We visited Hamersley Gorge on the same day too. Amazing.

Ready to go fishing

Ready to go fishing

Fishing today was a bit lean, we only brought home three red throat emperor and one cod. I caught quite a big emperor though so I was happy about that.

Port Smith Day 9

The White Cliffs

The White Cliffs

We actually heard a couple of showers of rain just before dawn-something we haven’t heard or seen much of in twelve weeks. It made for a nice morning, but I bet it brings the sandflies back with a vengeance.

At breakfast, we decided to take another day off fishing as it is pretty physical here, and we were both in need of some rest. We’d heard of a nice drive to what they call “The Cliffs” on the ocean so decided to go take a look before lunch.

It was beautiful-the white sandstone cliffs and blue ocean were really stunning. There were 3 groups fishing, and we were lucky enough to be there when one man hooked and landed a big tuna on the beach. Russ got down and hauled the fish in by its tail whilst the man continued to wind in. We were promised a chunk of tuna for our dinner and were thrilled when he brought us over a very generous amount..

Helping land a big tuna

Helping land a big tuna

Back home for lunch, I made us smoked fish and corn vol au vents.

Smoked Fish and Corn Vol Au Vents

  • 2 tablespoons light margarine (you could use butter)
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 1 400g can corn kernels
  • 100g smoked fish (or tuna, salmon, leftover steamed fish, whatever you like), flaked
  • 1 cup grated cheddar cheese, divided
  • Squeeze lemon juice
  • Salt and plenty of pepper to taste
Smoked fish and corn vol au vents

Smoked fish and corn vol au vents

Method

  1. Melt and heat the margarine over medium heat. Add the diced onion and cook gently for about 5 minutes until softened but not brown.
  2. Add the flour and cook stirring a couple of minutes, then add all the cold milk at once stirring quickly vigorously with a wooden spoon. I always make my white sauces this way and never get lumps. Feel free to do it your way though.
  3. Add the corn and stir through, then add the fish flakes. Reheat to simmer, then remove from the heat and add ¾ cup of cheese stir through then add the lemon juice and salt and pepper.
  4. Allow the mix to sit while you heat the empty vol au vent shells in a 180c oven for about 5 minutes, then fill them generously with mix and top with the remaining cheese.
  5. Bake at about 200c until the cheese is browned.

I had 6 medium shells to fill but made enough mixture to fill them and leave about 2/3 to have on toast tomorrow. You would easily fill 6 large vol au vents with the amount of mixture made.

Russ made us a smoked fish dip after lunch. We try to make our own dips rather than buy them so we know what we’re getting, and we turn all our leftover bread, rolls French sticks and baguettes into dried toasts rather than buy crackers and chips etc. We’d normally use green onion in this one, but didn’t have any, so red onion it was.

Smoked Fish Dip

  • 50g smoked fish (or tinned salmon or tuna), flaked
  • 2 tablespoons very finely chopped red onion
  • 2 teaspoons capers
  • 1 teaspoon horseradish
  • 2 tablespoons sour cream (we use low fat)
  • 2 tablespoons yoghurt (we use low fat)
  • 1 tablespoon mayonnaise (we use low fat)
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Method

  1. Mix together then refrigerate for a couple of hours to allow the flavours to blend.
  2. Serve with crackers or dried toasts as we do.
The 11k landmark

The 11k landmark

In the afternoon, we headed out to use the phone and internet. It’s an 11k drive down sandy 4WD track to get to a bay where you can get a signal from the Bidyadanga Community tower. It’s marked by a burned out car, but being us, we forgot the exact instructions and took the right hand turn after the car as opposed to the left before!

A lovely spot to sit and use the phone and computer

A lovely spot to sit and use the phone and computer

Russ fished whilst I phoned

Russ fished whilst I phoned

Never mind, we found a beautiful bay we’d been to many years before and got an excellent signal. Russ fished while I phoned and computed to my heart’s content, until the batteries ran out and the sandflies got the better of me.  We took a wrong turn on the way home too, and ended up coming back to the park by a completely different track past a huge flock of brolgas-a great round trip!

Part of a huge flock of brolgas (we counted 24) near the caravan park

Part of a huge flock of brolgas (we counted 24) near the caravan park

I marinated our very kindly given (but poorly filleted) tuna for a lovely dinner of Indian style fish, rice and raita. We might eat fish almost every day when we are catching it, but we seldom eat it the same way!

Indian Style Fish

  • ¾ cup natural yoghurt
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon chilli powder (I use red Kashmiri)
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon cardamom
  • ¼ teaspoon fenugreek powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Enough fish fillets for two people (I used tuna, but would usually use a firm white fish fillet)
  • Chopped fresh coriander
Indian style fish (tuna)

Indian style fish (tuna)

Method

  1. Mix together all the ingredients except the fish, then add the fish fillets making sure each is coated with the marinade.
  2. Allow to marinate for 20 minutes to half an hour, then cook under a hot grill or in a hot oven.
  3. Cook until the fish flakes but is not over cooked-start checking after about 8 minutes. Cooking time will depend on the thickness of your fillets.
  4. Scatter with chopped coriander and serve.

I thought recently that this blog is finally going the way I wanted-a bit of travel, a few markets, some fishing and some recipes using all that gorgeous fresh stuff.

Broome

Camel ride at sunset on Cable Beach

Camel ride at sunset on Cable Beach

6 years ago we visited Broome for the first time and didn’t really enjoy our two week stay. We decided that in the future we’d pass right by the turn off into town but we have good friends here so visited again two years ago.

Gantheaume Point

Gantheaume Point

Two years ago we stayed 9 nights and loved it. We realised then, that we’d not enjoyed the caravan park (and the site we were allotted) on our first stay. On our second visit, and this one, we decided to stay at Cable Beach Caravan park and our opinion of Broome changed dramatically! The only problem now is cost-at $52 a night for a site, it’s yet another place getting too expensive for us to stay at. It’s a pity because the sites are big and well shaded and the park has lots of ablution blocks with great, big, showers! We were given a site by the pool and although we haven’t swum in it, the water running over the rocks is a very pleasant sound to sit outside by.

It’s the last of our 5 nights tonight, and we really have had another good time. Our boat motor

Taken from Town Beach boat ramp as we launched the boat

Taken from Town Beach boat ramp as we launched the boat

had to be serviced and have some minor repairs done (very important it’s going well for Port Smith where we like to get right out in the sea on good days), then we got in two days of fishing. One the first, we launched off the Gantheaume Point end of Cable Beach. It was fairly windy, we caught no fish to speak off and I really didn’t enjoy the day. Yesterday we put in at Town Beach and headed up the creek-it was sheltered, not to hot, calm and we caught fish! A thoroughly enjoyable afternoon! Right now, I’m in the process of pickling the queen fish and trevally we caught and we’re having sooty grunter for dinner

As well as fishing, we’ve been enjoying sunsets on the beach, the beach, shopping and last night, we had dinner out at a Japanese restaurant with our good fiends Jimmy and Beth. We met Jimmy and Beth 7 years ago at Coral Bay when we were all caravanning. They gave up when they got to Broome, Beth got work and they bought a house and rescued a couple of dogs and a cat. They are the reason we keep visiting Broome now.

Sunset

Sunset

Dinosaur footprint

Dinosaur footprint

This morning with the very low tide, we walked out to the dinosaur footprints at Gantheaume Point. If anyone is liable to hurt themselves, it’s Russ, and he did a great job of it this morning. He slipped on the rocks as we were clambering over them to get back to the car and cut his hand and all the way up his arm on the barnacles on that rock. He really made a mess of it. After we’d been to the dinosaur footprints, we visited the Courthouse Market. It’s very big so I can’t believe that a market of it’s size had only ONE fresh fruit and veg stall which was annoying as we need to stock up for our stay at Port Smith. We go to Port Smith for 9 days tomorrow. This morning, I was pleased to run into Steve and Kathy who we met in Karumba and find out they’ll be spending a few days at Port Smith too.

Quick Pickled Fish

Ingredients

  • White vinegar
  • 1/2 Kg scaled fish fillets (fillets of herring or tommy rough can be used but whiting fillets are recommended)
  • 1 large onion, finely sliced
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil or peanut oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
  • 1 small clove of garlic – crushed
Pickled Fish

Pickled Fish


Optional Ingredients

  • 1/4 teaspoon chilli powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon lemon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon dill

Method

  1. Add all the ingredients to the vinegar and stir. Place the fillets in a suitable glass container and cover with the vinegar mix. Leave to stand for approximately 1/2 an hour

Pickled fillets are ready to eat after 1/2 an hour, but taste better if refrigerated and left for about 12 hours.
The fillets can be stored in the bottom of the refrigerator for up to 10 days. Always make sure that there is some liquid covering them when stored.
They can be used as an entrée,or a quick snack on a hot day – taste great.
NOTE: Quantities of herbs, spices and garlic can be varied to suit individual taste.

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