Kununurra


My favourite Kapok flowers

My favourite Kapok flowers

We’re now in Kununurra WA for a week. It’s been 6 years since we stayed 9 nights here, and 2 years since we spent two nights, so we thought it time to stop a while and have another good look around. We are at Lakeside Resort which (as the name suggests) is one of three caravan parks along the lake. We get beautiful sunsets from our site which is a waterside one! I love Kununurra. It’s on the Ord River so the irrigation scheme makes for a lot of agriculture and its very lush and green.

Putting out the yabby nets on lake Kununurra 2

Putting out the yabby nets on lake Kununurra 2

We thought we might be able to catch a few of the red claw yabbies here in the lake, so on arrival quickly got the boat organised to set our traps just on sunset. Yabbies are vegetarians, so as we’d lost the last of our fruit and veg at the NT/WA border, we also had to do a quick shop to buy them some melon, sweet potato and oranges. It was beautiful out on the water putting the traps out and I got some lovely sunset photos. The following morning, Russ woke at 6am and went out to bring the traps in. We’d caught 1 poor little yabby for all that hard work and the man following Russ into the boat ramp suggested the wheel bearings on our fold up trailer might be shot (something we already suspected). After the poor catch and the trailer disaster, we’ve given up on yabbies this visit.

In the wake of a ski boat that overtook us

In the wake of a ski boat that overtook us

Yesterday, we drove back across the border into NT and visited the Keep River National Park for the first time. It’s like a smaller version of the Bungles (it’s rocks are the same geological formation), with better roads in and far fewer visitors. We actually had the 6k Nigli Gap walk all to ourselves, and shared our lunch spot with one pair of campers.

Our first stop was at the Visitor Information Centre and the short walk to Cockatoo Lagoon. We spotted 3 magpie geese and a few ibis but the drying lagoon seems to have sent the other water birds elsewhere. After that we headed to Jarnem campground where we began the Nigli Gap walk.

Nigli Gap Walk

Nigli Gap Walk

The walk was marked easy/moderate, but was super easy even for a couch potato like me! Far easier than the walk into the Cascades at Litchfield NP. It was quite hot and unshaded for the first half, but the second half took us beneath trees and we were shaded by the stunning rocks as well. We thought we were walking in to see a rock painting of the serpent-the largest ever found, but it turned out to be a couple of time faded emus, boomerangs and a small snake. We met some people later on who think that several rock art sites have been closed to the public.

We did a short walk into G and finally walked to the top of Gingers Hill Walk to view an aboriginal structure said to be for catching hawks. Not sure I know why the aboriginals would need to trap hawks-I’m sure there are much better things to eat in the area!

On the way home from Keep River NP, we decided we had time to drive down to Lake Argyle for a quick look. We stayed 4 nights beside it 6 years ago, so just wanted to make sure it was till there. Lake Argyle is so large, to boat on it (and we did 6 years ago) you are subject to the same rules as boating in the ocean as it’s considered open water! We took a few photos then headed home.

Lake Argyle

Lake Argyle

Ord River Ivanhoe Crossing

Ord River Ivanhoe Crossing

Today, we drove out to Ivanhoe Crossing expecting to be able to have a bit of a play. It’s great fun driving through the fast running water that flows across it and makes for fantastic photos. It was closed! Never mind, I still managed to take about 100 photos. After that, we drove back in to town a different way stopping at a farm gate to buy a heap of vegies, and the sandalwood factory for a look. We also wanted to find out why the sandalwood trees are grown closely amongst other trees. It turns out they are parasitic and need a variety of host trees at different stages to grow. Question answered! Finally on the way back into town, we called in and picked up our boat trailer. We feel so lucky the problem happened here where we’d booked for a week, and it was easy to find a marine mechanic!

A visit to the Bridge over the Ord, Coles for some lamb for dinner (Moroccan Lamb, couscous and a watermelon salad), and lastly the purchase of 2 yummy home made pies from a local bakery for our lunch and the morning was done.

Right now I’m making corn relish using 4 corn cobs I bought at the farm gate, as I just finished the jar I brought from home. It’s yummy with sausages or cold meats, but I especially love to mix equal amounts of low fat yoghurt and sour cream, toss in a few chopped pickled jalapeños and some chopped fresh coriander and use it as a dip!

Roasted Corn Relish

  • 4 corn cobs, kernels removed
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 1 red capsicum, diced
  • 1 green capsicum, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 long red chilli, finely diced
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 2 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 2 tablespoons cornflour
  • 1/4 cup water

Roasted Corn Relish

Method

  1. Preheat oven to moderate 180c. Combine all vegetables, garlic and chili in a baking dish and toss with the oil.
  2. Bake for 30 minutes, then allow to cool.
  3. In a large saucepan, combine vinegars, sugar, seeds and turmeric; bring slowly to the boil over a medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar.
  4. Reduce the heat to low and stir in the vegetables. Simmer for 20-25 minutes stirring occasionally. In a small bowl, blend the cornflour into water and add to the mixture in the saucepan. Cook stirring for 4-5 minutes or until the mixture thickens.
  5. Spoon into hot, sterilised jars and seal immediately. Label and date when cool.

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